About Dyslexia

How can I tell if my child is dyslexic?

There are many symptoms of dyslexia including the following:

  • He seems more intelligent than his reading suggests (both boys and girls can be dyslexic, but boys tend to outnumber girls by approximately 3 or 4:1, so the term ‘he’ is used throughout).
  • Typical dyslexia reading errors include:
    Reads very slowly and hesitantly.
    Reads words backwards – ‘on’ for ‘no’, ‘was’ for ‘saw’, etc.
    Reads letters in the wrong order – ‘left’ for ‘felt’, ‘act’ for ‘cat’, etc.
  • He seems more intelligent than his written work suggests.
  • Typical dyslexia writing errors include:
    Reverses letters – ‘b’ for ‘d’, ‘p’ for ‘q’, etc.
    Turns letters upside down – ‘n’ for ‘u’, ‘m’ for ‘w’, etc.
    Writes letters in the wrong order – ‘chidl’ for ‘child’.
  • He has difficulty with rhyme.
  • He may have been a late or poor talker and may still have immature speech.
  • He may have been a late walker and may still not be well coordinated.
  • He may have been a late walker and may still not be well coordinated.
  • He may have difficulty with short-term memory.
  • He may have been late learning to tell the time or tie his shoelaces.
  • He may have difficulty putting things in the right order.
  • He may have difficulty knowing left from right.
  • He may not be able to concentrate well.
  • He may be poor at copying from the board.
  • He may be poorly organized.
  • There may be a family history of late reading or poor spelling.

Parents can gain useful pointers as to whether their child might be dyslexic in an assessment of a child as young as 4½.

The dyslexic child can often have other associated difficulties.